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NOAA OED - ELG FY2005 Awardees
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Environmental Literacy Grants Program

Environmental Literacy Grants: FY06

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Overview of Funding Announcement

NOAA’s Office of Education (OEd) solicited proposals for environmental literacy projects lasting 1 to 5 years. Funding was made available to support formal and informal education projects aimed at building environmental literacy among the public. Two priorities were established for FY06. Funded proposals either (1) further the use and incorporation of the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts in formal and informal education and/or measure ocean literacy among the public; or (2) strengthen the capacity to develop a workforce knowledgeable about weather and climate. All funded projects employ the strategies articulated in the NOAA Education Plan and involve NOAA entities as partners.

Awards

Priority 1: Funded projects in this priority area further the use and incorporation of the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts in formal and informal education and/or measure ocean literacy among the public. $1.61 million was awarded in FY 2005. For more information regarding specific awards, please contact the Office of Education Grants Team.

Project Title

PI/co-PI/Institution(s)

Amount Awarded

Abstract

Signals of Spring - ACES (Animals in Curriculum-based Ecosystem Studies)

Glen Schuster, U.S. Satellite Laboratory

$ 599,862

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Building Ocean Literacy in our youth through unique learning experiences in our National Marine Sanctuaries

Nicole Crane, Cal State University - Monterey Bay ( Camp SEA Lab)

$413,592

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Ocean Science - Formal and Informal Education for Ocean Literacy

Kathy Sider, Karen Matsumoto, Cherie Williams, Seattle Aquarium

$599,735

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Priority 2: Strengthen the capacity to develop a workforce knowledgeable in weather and climate. $1.16 million was awarded in FY 2005. For more information regarding specific awards, please contact the Office of Education Grants Team.  

Project Title

PI/co-PI/Institution(s)

Amount Awarded

Abstract

CoCoRaHS: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network - Enhancing Environmental Literacy through Participation and Research

Nolan J. Doesken, Robert Cifelli, CIRA, Colorado State University

$585,005

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Interpreting Global Half-Hourly Cloud Observations to Promote Weather and Climate Literacy

Rosamond Kinzler, Maritza MacDonald, American Museum of Natural History

$513,792

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Priority 1 Abstracts

Title: Signals of Spring - ACES (Animals in Curriculum-based Ecosystem Studies)
Institution: U.S. Satellite Laboratory
PI: Glen Schuster
Amount Awarded: $599,861
Abstract: Signals of Spring ACES (Animals in Curriculum-based Ecosystem Studies), will use NOAA remote sensing data with curriculum-based activities for middle and high school students. Students use Earth imagery to explain the movement of animals that are tracked by satellite with NOAA’s ARGOS monitoring system. The project addresses the issues surrounding the animals and environments of NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuaries (NMS).  Comprehensive teacher professional development will be delivered both onsite and online for 250 teachers. The project will impact 20,000 students and parents. Ten curriculum modules will be delivered to students, accompanied with an investigation of El Niño and animals, as well as ocean life and global climate change.  ACES will provide classrooms with the curricular area of conservation and the ecological issues surrounding the ocean, using marine animals as the engaging component.  Students will apply NOAA Earth data to animal migrations and the critical environmental issues that face these animals that are of depleting populations.  Once teachers and students have the necessary skills to interpret data, students will perform the ACES investigations. 

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Title: Building Ocean Literacy in our youth through unique learning experiences in our National Marine Sanctuaries
Institution: Camp SEA Lab/Foundation of California State University Monterey Bay
PI: Nicole Crane
Amount Awarded: $413,592
Abstract: This project aims to develop and implement residential and non-residential science camp and summer camp programs and related activities to over 1500 youth and teachers from 8 elementary and middle schools.  The NOAA/MBNMS MERITO program will serve as a key outreach mechanism to reach underserved youth and their families.  The proposed project will utilize existing ocean educational materials, including NOAA curricula, in experiential learning programs for youth through Camp SEA (Science, Education, Adventure) Lab.  The two major goals of the project are to: 1) Work closely with the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary to develop and implement marine-oriented outdoor science camp and summer camp programs, thus developing an effective model for dissemination of the Principles to large numbers of youth and their teachers.  A pilot MERITO summer program would be part of this; and 2) To develop a model and a feasibility plan to implement the program across a broader geographical area (e.g. through other Sanctuary sites). 

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Title: Ocean Science - Formal and Informal Education for Ocean Literacy
Institution: Seattle Aquarium
PIs: Kathy Sider, Karen Matsumoto, Cherie Williams
Amount Awarded: $500,735
Abstract:  Ocean Science will integrate the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts into a Western Washington region-wide, coordinated program of formal and informal education consisting of: 1. Teacher professional development in the ocean sciences to integrate the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts into inquiry-based marine science education and instruction. 2. Evaluation and re-alignment of existing Sound Science ecosystems curricula into Ocean Science, incorporating NOAA data and promoting the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts.  3. Classroom programs, beach field investigations, and on-site programs at the Seattle Aquarium of the Olympic Coast national Marine Sanctuary’s Olympic Coast Discovery Center for grades 4-5 students, their parents and teachers. 4. Parent training in ocean science content, the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts, and inquiry-based methods for supporting their children’s science education. 5. Informal education for the general public via an interactive learning station linked to the Window on Washington Waters exhibit (opens spring 2007) and designed to innovatively use NOAA data and information (videos, computer simulations and other creative media) to increase and evaluate ocean literacy in adults and children.  Window on Washington Waters will display the outer coast marine environments and sea life of the Washington Olympic Coast national Marine Sanctuary.

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Priority 2 Abstracts

Title: CoCoRaHS: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network - Enhancing Environmental Literacy through Participation in Climate Monitoring and Research
Institution: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University
PIs: Nolan J. Doesken, Robert Cifelli
Amount Awarded: $585,005
Abstract: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) involves thousands of people of all ages in the observation and study of weather, climate and water resources. In CoCoRaHS, citizens of all ages help measure and report rain, hail and snow from their own homes, schools and businesses.  These data are then efficiently collected via the internet, archived in a national database, and made immediately available to participants, scientists and the general public showing the fascinating patterns of precipitation from each passing storm. The measurement of precipitation and the patterns, variations and impacts that result, open the door to creative study of our environment.  It is the “lowest common denominator” of hydroclimatic exploration. In this project, data from the CoCoRaHS “citizen science” network will be shared with and utilized by NOAA partners to help monitor drought, to help detect local severe storms, to alert local authorities to developing flash flood situations, to provide “ground truth” for NOAA and NASA remote sensing technologies, and to provide verification for both local and national weather and climate forecast products. 

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Title: Interpreting Global Half-Hourly Cloud Observations to Promote Weather and Climate Literacy
Institution: American Museum of Natural History (AMNH)
PIs: Rosamond Kinzler, Maritza MacDonald
Amount Awarded: $580,265
Abstract: AMNH will use NOAA weather satellite data to annotate 72 high definition (HD) video time-series global cloud cover visualizations using thermal infrared brightness temperature data acquired by five geostationary satellites and joined into global mosaics at half-hourly intervals.  The HD visualizations will be used in informal and formal education activities and will be made available on the Web.  These media pieces will be used for informal education activities at AMNH and 28 other informal science institutions (ISI) around the United States.  The target population of visitors to subscribing ISIs is currently ten million and is projected to be over 15 million by the end of the grant.  The HD visualizations will be used in formal settings, as well.  Fifteen schools throughout New York City with large numbers of new English Language Learners will be targeted and professional development for teachers of ELL students will be provided through programs at AMNH as well. AMNH’s effort focuses on weather and climate patterns that will be visible in the cloud-data visualizations.  All viewers of the media will learn about general circulation patterns and changes in phase of water associated with the hydrologic cycle.

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